July 2010

Chicken and shrimp soba salad with sesame sauce

There's a new recipe from me, on another site - take a look! And a bit about the, uh, photo shoot...

hospital-IV.jpg

About how I ended up in a French hospital, and how it's been. Some angst and pretty dodgy looking food pics follow.

radio_taiso.jpg

Using a form of exercise that's a Japanese cultural institution, to get my circulation going while I'm stuck in a French hospital.

gf1-1.jpg

(Hi everyone. As Guruman posted, I was hospitalized for emergency surgery 2 weeks ago, and I'm still in hospital unfortunately. So there won't be any new recipes from me for the time being. However, I still have lots of topics from my Japan trip to talk about. Here's an article I was working on before I had to go to the doctor, and I was able to finish it up today finally. I'll try to be back to full throttle real soon!)

Back in March, I got a new camera in Tokyo; the <a href="Panasonic Lumix DMC-GF1. I think this one just might be the ideal camera for many food bloggers who are looking to upgrade their point-and-shoots, or for a lighter alternative to a DSLR. Here's a review of the micro four-thirds format itself and this camera in particular. It's not a very technical review - there are plenty of those online elsewhere. Instead it's focused on the photography needs of a typical food blogger.

Filed under: 

Maki had to undergo emergency surgery yesterday, July 6. Everything went well, and she is recovering now, although she may well have to stay at the hospital for a week or so.

We keep the site up and running as good as possible, but it will take some time until new articles will be possible.

In the meantime "Get well soon, Maki!"

Filed under: 
Keep reading News from Maki →

tamagodofu1.jpg

(From the archives - something cool and easy, perfect for the summer. Originally published in July 2008.)

Previously, I explained how some dishes that are not tofu are called -tofu, because of the shape, texture or both. This is the case with tamago dofu, a smooth savory egg custard that's served cold.

You can make it in a square mold, to make it look tofu-like. But I prefer to keep it a lot simpler by cooking the tamago dofu in the serving container it will be served in. This can be anything as long as it's heat-proof. Here I have used some sturdy glass cups made of pressed glass, but I've also used little pudding molds, tiny glass bowls made for holding ingredients while you're cooking, and even coffee cups.

There are very few ingredients in a tamago dofu: dashi or soup stock, eggs, and a few flavorings. Because of this, each component should be of top quality, because you'll taste each one quite clearly. Traditionally the soup component is dashi, but I don't really like the fish flavor of dashi when it's cold. So I prefer to make a simple vegetable stock instead.

Tamago dofu should be served ice cold. It's a great appetizer for a summer meal, or an interesting and soothing snack. I have been guilty of making 4 cups and 'hiding' them so I can eat them all by myself.