Poll: Do you worry about rising food prices, and how to deal with the situation?

Yes I worry a lot.
43% (318 votes)
I worry a little, not much.
45% (332 votes)
I don't worry about it all.
11% (79 votes)
Other
0% (3 votes)
Don't know
1% (4 votes)
Total votes: 736
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I’m a student, and already

I’m a student, and already the biggest portion of my spending is food. I don’t want to have to eat bad food just because it’s cheap. Although I’m not an experienced cook, I’d rather work with fresh ingredients than have instant ramen every night like a lot of people in my dorm building. (Fortunately, we do have a kitchen.) I go to a private art college in San Francisco, and tuition and housing costs are always rising. (Financial aid only helps out so much.) Now food is getting more expensive too??

Looks like I might end up being a “starving art student” after all. Am I really going to have to start choosing between art supplies and nutritious food? What’s next—dying of tuberculosis in a drafty garret apartment? What era is this, anyway?

Stella | 17 April, 2008 - 06:27

I totally agree with Stella.

I totally agree with Stella. I’m also a student, but in a very different manner. I’m an American studying in the UK, and everything here is SO expensive. I’m paying an arm and a leg for cereal just because of the exchange rate. CEREAL!

Fresh fruit are very expensive, so that sucks as well. I’m probably going to live on potatoes and milk for the rest of my time here. How horrible :(

Jeanna | 19 April, 2008 - 14:46

rising food prices

Although I voted that I worried a little, not much, actually I am not worried at all, rather I am concerned. Not for myself in any way, I can afford rising food costs. However, I am most concerned about the people who cannot afford to eat healthy food even at today’s prices.

anon | 17 April, 2008 - 08:39

I worry about the world we are in!

I am student, however I’ve never ran hungry. Well maybe when i was just too lazy to make anything! So to hear those kind of news is more concerning for those who suffer from regular starvation. I worry about the world we live in, knowing the world weapon supply budget for 5 years would be enough to irrigate whole Africa enabling people to make agriculture as well as irradiate hunger in the world, therefore people would stop dying of hunger! Blows my mind out! I guess more lives is not profitable to those capitalists ruling our countries. I guess they think it’s way of controlling world population. Good job guys!!! Depressing…
On a more positive note, I love your website!

Chrissy | 17 April, 2008 - 17:03

Those “capitalists” you

Those “capitalists” you disparage will be providing a job for you someday as well as currently funding agriculture and many other things besides making weapons. Governments produce nothing: they spend the taxpayers money. If the USA would, as many Americans wish, withhold its annual “dues” to the UN, the largest amount of all the countries, that enormous capital could be used for other, better purposes than lining the pockets of third-world representatives and their cronies — who apparently worry less about their own starving countrymen’s welfare than you. But the argument that this or that expenditure could be better used to end world hunger is a simplified student’s argument, completely ignoring the effect of world and local politics in what is grown, what is marketable, protective tariffs, and so on. It will be your turn in the future to fix what you decry now. Meanwhile, my taxes are used to heavily subsidize ethanol, a fool’s solution to energy which drives up the price of food everywhere. We all recognize that the price of agricultural products is rising around the world, to the detriment of those who can least afford it. As a historical footnote, after serving in WWII, my husband completed his college education, surviving on bread, mustard, and bologna sandwiches. The price of bread was as important to him then as the price of bread is to many right now.

SBS | 17 April, 2008 - 21:43

Simplified student argument?

I don’t think you can push aside such arguments so easily, although it is unquestionably an utopia. As much it would be for the western world to give up their military plans as it would be for the third world to receive such assistance for various reason. My hubby is currently taking part in the Engineer Without Border projects and they can’t even keep their equipments they bring because it get “cease” by African authorities. That being said, I do believe weapons can be related to the hunger crises that is taking place at the moment. However our government is investing in agriculture, it doesn’t bring enough dough. And yes I know that they must seek dough somewhere to pay for our very expensive health care (I live in Canada). That again being said, most of the weapons use today can related to what? Yes, oil that is. And that, as oppose to agriculture, brings in the dough. But! you have to deal with the Middle East or even Russia, which we all know aren’t our best friends (If you read The World State there is a very good article about Middle East wars) . So they are now turning to ethanol, which they say is a good replacement (it in fact isn’t, it even pollutes just as much as regular oil). And that is the reason which explain the rise of the food cost. I don’t know if my arguments are really clearly put, but there is a relation.

Chrissy | 18 April, 2008 - 15:22

You are closer to the cause

You are closer to the cause when you say “oil” rather than “weapons.” The oil sheikhs control the output of oil, enabling speculators to drive up the price and the rest of the world to pay it. Instead of always looking to America to provide free money to various causes worldwide, the finger should be pointed at the oil-rich kingdoms. The cost of all transportation rises with oil prices, and increased energy costs are included in the price of food.
The simplified argument (or hope) is that any large expenditure for any purpose by any country would suddenly cease and that the money would instead be given to the world outside that country to cure some favored problem. It doesn’t happen that way. Your husband’s experience with equipment being confiscated by those it is meant to help is exactly the frustrating example that is repeated on larger scales. The goodwill and effort is squandered, and the local population continues to suffer.
But the question for this forum is not how to solve world hunger but rather if the rising price of food worries you and how do you deal with it. The poll presently shows that most of the voters worry a little but not much. All apparently try to cope as best they can. Your comments show you are very caring but just as helpless as the rest of us to do much about the truly starving in other countries. Through charitable donations and government welfare programs, we try to take care of our own less fortunate — wherever we are.

SBS | 18 April, 2008 - 18:11

With a hefty mortgage on my

With a hefty mortgage on my shoulders, food prices definitely worry me a lot. Even the price of fresh fruit and vegetables has gone up a lot - and as much as I’d like to eat better, organic is just out of my price range.

And although I love baking, it’s getting to be an expensive hobby! I just made the recipe for peanut butter cups, which used 500g of chocolate! Half a kilo of chocolate these days is quite expensive.

Chinalilly | 18 April, 2008 - 09:23

Organic on a budget

I have linked to this a few times in the past, but I shall again - Rebecca Blood did a one month experiment eating organically (and vegetarian) on a food stamp budget last year and of course, blogged the experience. Must reading!

Eating Organically on a food stamp budget

maki | 18 April, 2008 - 14:47

At this point, I am paying

At this point, I am paying half as much for food each month as I am for rent. The rest of my check—every month—goes to paying off my student loans. I’m looking forward to summer—since I haven’t been able to buy fresh produce since around November, it’s just so expensive. And I have an full-time job that even gives me health insurance.

Yes, I’m very worried.

eva | 19 April, 2008 - 00:05

Mottainai! I recently read

Mottainai! I recently read about taking leftovers like apple peels, citrus rinds, or even cucumber peels to make a flavored water. Talk about not wasting a thing!

Okazu helps, although I have to be honest, sometimes even I don’t want to eat what I come up with. I freeze mini portions of leftovers for bento lunches.

I don’t worry for myself. I do worry for my children who haven’t reached a more comfortable financial situation for their own lives. It’s a shame when someone may have to choose between a healthy meal or a roof.

Hakujin | 20 April, 2008 - 02:56

Everything settles down eventually...but for now be frugal

Hi all,
I just joined “Just Hungry” and new to the Bento box can’t wait to get started.

Being aware when you grab for something at the market is what helps me save money during the fast rise in food costs. I plan very carefully what we need and what we can do without.

I found that if I make some pickled veggie dishes they last longer than the fresh crunchy salads…without so much waste.

When at the produce market if they have a cart with products reduced because of a blemish I take advantage of it and remove the bad section and make a apple pie for example. It tastes good and saves a few dollars.

Instead of buying meat from the deli I buy a piece of turkey breast cook it for dinner then prepare sandwiches from the leftovers same with other meats…the deli prices are triple compared to the whole piece of meat per pound.

The more you study your needs and what you can live without you can really stretch your food dollar…and feel good doing it.

Stop long enough to use all your senses before putting the spoon to your mouth….Geri

Mama_Jazzy_Geri | 31 July, 2008 - 04:06

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